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Ejercicios
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Movement in English can be very confusing.

In this exercise we look at the verb to "walk" combined with many synonyms.

The important thing to remember is that the preposition indicates the DIRECTION. The verb describes HOW the movement is made.

In English and Spanish grammar, many things seem to be exact opposites. 

In this exercise we are talking about movement, (1) [from A] -> (2) [you are here] -> (3) [to B]. Notice the three positions!

We are NOT talking about place [you are here]. Static.

 

In Spanish you say: “Fuimos en coche,” “Bajé la calle caminando,” “Subí las escaleras corriendo,” “Entré en la tienda de un salto/en un pispas”. You use a verb: ir, bajar, subir, entrar, etc. with an expression / gerund that indicates HOW you moved. 

 

“From” and “to” also work with all the other prepositions. "Away" and "back" are similar.

Remember when you make a movement you are always between two points! 

Now, consider the English preposition as the Spanish verb: 

“across” means “cruzar”. 

“along” means “moverse a lo largo de un lugar”. 

“around”/”round” (rodeando, dando una(s) vuelta(s)) 

“away” (alejarse) 

“back” (regresar) 

“down” (bajar) 

“from” (punto de partida) 

“in”/”into” (Use “in” without a place”. But use "into" when you indicate the place “into the room”) 

off (opposite: “on” (In Spanish this indicates “bajar” or “quitar(se)”) 

on/onto (Use “on” without a place”. But use "onto" or "on to" when you indicate the place “onto the wall”) 

out (of) (Use “out” without a place”. But use "out of" when you indicate the place “out of the room”) 

over (from one side to another) 

past (Move in front of/along, but without stopping) 

round 

through (you interpret the place to be 3D "through the park"– There are many trees there. In contrast, "across the park" There are no trees, only grass) 

to (destination) 

towards (in the general direction of a place. It is not necessarily your destination!) 

under 

up


Some examples with: ACROSS 

I walked across the park. 

(Crucé el parque.) 

I walked away across the park. 

(Me alejé cruzando el parque.) 

I walked away from the fountain across the park. 

(Me alejé de la fuente y crucé el parque.) 

I walked away from the fountain across the park to the exit. 

(Me alejé de la fuente y crucé el parque hasta la salida.) 

I walked back across the park. 

(Crucé el parque de regreso/ Regresé por el parque (cruzándolo).) 

I walked back from the fountain across the park. 

(Regresé desde la fuente cruzando el parque. / Crucé el parque de vuelta desde la fuente.) 

I walked back from the fountain across the park to the exit. 

(Crucé el parque de vuelta desde la fuente hasta la salida.) 


 

Now look at these synonyms for “walk”: advance (military movement),

amble (careless – not a care in the world),

canter (horse movement),

escort (accompany), 

file (in a single line),

go on foot,

hike,

hit the road,

knock about (move about/around town doing little jobs),

lead someone,

lumber (big awkward movements like a bear),

march (like soldiers, with great purpose/anger),

meander (like a river),

pad (as if you had an animal’s soft feet),

parade (on show – often negative),

patrol (when you behave like the police!),

plod (also police-related: the officer who walks with a heavy step plomp, plomp, plomp),

prance (like a deer), 

race (in a hurry),

roam (you’ll recognise this verb from your mobile phone carrier – it means moving from one place to another),

rove (similar to roam – often to rove out, especially at night!),

run,

saunter (carefree, innocent – as if butter would not melt in your mouth!),

shamble (like a big heavy horse),

shuffle (not lifting your feet off the ground),

slog (this also means constant hard heavy work),

stalk (to obsessively follow),

step (pasos),

stride (pasos largos),

stroll (paseo tranquilo), 

strut (like a bird, showing off, giving oneself importance),

toddle (walk like a baby),

traipse (like a fairy),

tramp (heavy steps),

tread (step – heavily or lightly), 

trek,

troop (a lot of people),

trudge (slog),

wander (roam),

wend one's way (like George in the jungle. There are lots of obstacles!) 

 

These expressions are used with “it” and mean “go/leave a place very quickly” 

Foot it, leg it, hike it, hoof it 


 

Download the document in a pdf file here.

I was never happy with this exercise.

These spinners will probably help you to understand why. I think I probably need to make this a lot simpler first.



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www.alanspeak.com content by Alan Egan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Creative Commons License
www.alanspeak.com content by Alan Egan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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